Monthly Archives: March 2013

Review: Animal Farm by George Orwell

Animal Farm
Rating:

It took me by surprise how much I loved this classic and how eerily relevant and applicable it is considering today’s politics, Britain’s in particular. The Arab Spring is also a good example of a modern day Animal Farm.

I highlighted this one to death. In pencil, of course. I’m not a barbarian.

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Warm Bodies (Warm Bodies #1) by Isaac Marion

Warm Bodies (Warm Bodies, #1)Rating:

While I enjoyed the imaginative, quirky and humorous writing style of Warm Bodies, the events and dialogue defied believability and I just couldn’t finish. But I did go and see the movie which I managed to sit through, though I did do a fair amount of cringing, it cut out the more unrealistic elements of the story, e.g. the school for zombie children to teach them how to hunt and feed.

Stuck @ 27%.

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Final Boarding (Turbulence, #8) by Jordan Castillo Price

Final Boarding (Turbulence, #8)Rating:

I never thought I’d ever 1-star anything JCP had written, and I feel bad for doing so now. I don’t know what exactly happened, but I just can’t believe the quality of this final instalment. I can only assume Price didn’t quite know how to end the serial, in which I expected a big sci-fi reveal on the reason for Bermuda’s turbulence and why Marlin killed himself. What we got didn’t make much sense and was completely unsatisfactory. I hope one day Price revisits and rewrites the ending.

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Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss

Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us
Rating:

Cynical people: it’s worse than you can even imagine. Privacy infringements, systematic exploitation of children and African Americans, government corruption, and a willful disregard of consumers’ health. Moss’s three and a half years of investigative reporting for Salt Sugar Fat were well worth the effort, though his writing isn’t concise, and boring when it came to describing the careers of food scientists he clearly admires, the points he makes are startling and incredibly important. Although America is the primary country talked about, the problems discussed are global issues.

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