Tag Archives: books about books

Are You My Mother?: A Comic Drama by Alison Bechdel

Are you my mother alison bechdelRating: ★★★☆☆

As an autobiographical sequel to Fun Home, Bechdel’s approach to analysing her relationship with her mother couldn’t be more different to how she examined the one with her father. If you have a problem with dry psychoanalysis, then you may struggle with Are You My Mother?

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Fun Home: a family tragicomic by Alison Bechdel

Fun Home a tragicomic Alison BechdelRating: 

An erudite, self-aware feminist memoir, in graphic novel form, examining a lesbian’s childhood relationship with her parents – especially her closeted gay father. Fun Home is chock full of psychoanalysis, literary criticism and commentary on gender, sexuality and suicide. You may recognise the author’s name from her Bechdel Test, which ‘asks if a work of fiction features at least two women who talk to each other about something other than a man’ to indicate gender bias (Wikipedia).

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Review: The Library of Babel by Jorge Luis Borges

The Library of BabelRating:

Completely confounding. An intriguing idea poorly executed. Even reading slowly didn’t improve understanding. Beautifully written sentences were meaningless without much background or context.

I honestly didn’t perceive the allegory; the library representing the universe, its books filled with information detailing everything within it, though in an incomprehensible manner – multiple languages represented in each volume.

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How to Read Literature by Terry Eagleton

How to Read Literature
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‘Good poems and novels are those that transcend their age and speak meaningfully to us all. They deal in permanent, imperishable features of human existence – in joy, suffering, grief, death and sexual passion, rather than in the local and incidental.’

Literary criticism: where philosophy and psychology meet.

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