Tag Archives: graphic novels

Are You My Mother?: A Comic Drama by Alison Bechdel

Are you my mother alison bechdelRating: ★★★☆☆

As an autobiographical sequel to Fun Home, Bechdel’s approach to analysing her relationship with her mother couldn’t be more different to how she examined the one with her father. If you have a problem with dry psychoanalysis, then you may struggle with Are You My Mother?

Continue reading Are You My Mother?: A Comic Drama by Alison Bechdel

The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 2: Fandemonium by Kieron Gillen & Jamie McKelvie

fandemonium wicked divineRating: ☆☆☆☆

Waste of paper. No, that’s not right. That’s offensive to the artists as the illustrations were brilliant, but there may as well have been no words. Seriously. Very little happens. At least very little that makes sense or contributes to plot progression. Only the last few pages have any real meaning with a humdinger of a cliffhanger that leaves you with multiple questions and countless theories.

SPOILERS AHEAD. Continue reading The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 2: Fandemonium by Kieron Gillen & Jamie McKelvie

Those Left Behind (Serenity #1) by Joss Whedon & Brett Matthews

Serenity those left behind joss whedonRating: ★★☆☆☆

Although I’ve only watched Firefly twice, I’ve seen Serenity countless times. While Those Left Behind‘s dialogue and personalities match the original show, the story lacks substance and the artwork . . .

Continue reading Those Left Behind (Serenity #1) by Joss Whedon & Brett Matthews

Alex + Ada, Vol. 1 by Jonathan Luna

Alex + Ada, Vol 1 by Jonathan LunaRating: ★★★★

“I will gladly do anything you ask as long as it does not harm humans, animals, or property. I will avoid putting myself in danger unless it is to protect you or by your command. The Tanaka logo on my wrist is the only physical indication that I am an android and I am required by law to keep it exposed at all times. I am not allowed to handle legal tender or helm a vehicle, so please keep that in mind if you send me out on errands. I am in your hands, now. Please take good care of me.”

Continue reading Alex + Ada, Vol. 1 by Jonathan Luna

The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 1: The Faust Act by Kieron Gillen & Jamie McKelvie

The Wicked + The Divine, vol. 1: The Faust ActRating: 2 stars

What kind of teenager are you that you don’t have Class A drugs to hand? Hmm? Has The Daily Mail been lying to me?
Lucifer

Every 90 years twelve gods from multiple pantheons are reincarnated in young people to live for two years. The gods reincarnated are different each time and don’t necessarily live out the full two years, as the opening pages can attest with only four gods left at the end of the last cycle in 1923, skulls perched in the empty seats. Ananke is their guardian, goddess of fate, necessity and destiny. She’s their protector, but also their judge, jury and, if necessary, their executioner.

Continue reading The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 1: The Faust Act by Kieron Gillen & Jamie McKelvie

The Fade Out, Vol. 1 by Ed Brubaker & Sean Phillips

The Fade Out, vol. 1 by Ed BrubakerRating: 1 star

Offensive racist stereotyping, rampant sexism, an abundance of rape, clichéd and disjointed storytelling and an unwieldy cast of homogenous characters of which to keep track – what’s not to love about this 1940s noir in graphic novel form?

Continue reading The Fade Out, Vol. 1 by Ed Brubaker & Sean Phillips

Through the Woods by Emily Carroll

Through the Woods by Emily Carroll Rating: 4 stars

Of all of the gothic horror graphic novel fairy tales in this collection, Carroll’s unnerving take on Bluebeard A Lady’s Hands Are Cold blew me away. It’s the most complete and satisfying of the bunch. Gorgeous, vivid illustrations and lyrical yet elegantly simple prose. And the goriest story of them all while the others thrive mostly on what you cannot see.

There was a girl
& there was a man
And there was the girl’s father
who said, “you will marry this man.”

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The Non-fiction ‘Graphic Novel’ – is there a better term?

I’ve been reading quite a few graphic novels of late, for lack of a better phrase, not all of which were the fiction implied by the term ‘graphic novel’. No, Hyperbole and a Half, Fun Home: a family tragicomic, and Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant? are memoirs.

Continue reading The Non-fiction ‘Graphic Novel’ – is there a better term?