Tag Archives: horror

Through the Woods by Emily Carroll

Through the Woods by Emily Carroll Rating: 4 stars

Of all of the gothic horror graphic novel fairy tales in this collection, Carroll’s unnerving take on Bluebeard A Lady’s Hands Are Cold blew me away. It’s the most complete and satisfying of the bunch. Gorgeous, vivid illustrations and lyrical yet elegantly simple prose. And the goriest story of them all while the others thrive mostly on what you cannot see.

There was a girl
& there was a man
And there was the girl’s father
who said, “you will marry this man.”

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Metzengerstein by Edgar Allan Poe

Metzengerstein
Rating:

Hatfields & McCoys meets Sleepy Hollow (Tim Burton’s movie, not the awful book or TV show).

Metzengerstein is Poe’s first published short story, and it was not good. Seven pages of confusing, and almost nonsensical, Hatfields and McCoys tale of two feuding families.

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The Monkey’s Paw by W.W. Jacobs

The Monkey's Paw
Rating:

“It has a spell put on it by an old fakir,” said the sergeant-major, “a very holy man. He wanted to show that fate ruled people’s lives, and that those who interfered with it did so to their sorrow. He put a spell on it so that three separate men could each have three wishes from it.”

A fascinating classic horror story that has definitely withstood the test of time. I don’t usually enjoy short stories but it seems Jacobs knew his craft because he didn’t leave us wanting.

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Meathouse Man by George R.R. Martin

Meathouse Man

Rating:

This is some fucked up shit. Misogynistic and necrophilic fucked up shit. With illustrations. My inner feminist is vibrating with rage and is drawing disturbing comparisons with serial killer Elliot Rodger.

The meathouse is a whorehouse whose ‘whores’ are dead women, most of whom are former criminals and debtors although some have been kidnapped and killed precisely to be commodified by transforming them into brainless undead prostitutes. Outside of the meathouses, corpses are used as workers directed by handlers (read: puppeteers), similar to what The People do with vampires in Ilona Andrews’s Kate Daniels series. The entertainment industry is dominated by corpse fights like the gladiators of old, their handlers manipulating them like 3-D real world video game characters.

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Review: Ligeia by Edgar Allan Poe

Ligeia
Rating:

The madness of grief personified.

Passionately in love with Ligeia, his wife, until she dies and he becomes obsessed with every detail of her memory. Later marrying Lady Rowena because he secretly likes that she ‘shunned’ him at every turn and that she’s Ligeia’s opposite in every way, but despite this he hates her because she’s not the one he loved most.

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