Tag Archives: mental health

Authors Stalking Reviewers: From intimidatory Kathleen Hale to violent Richard Brittain #HaleNo

Kathleen HaleUntil now authors stalking reviewers had largely remained in cyber space rather than face-to-face. Kathleen Hale spent money finding the address a writer of a one-star review of Hale’s book, hired a car and landed on the doorstep of an understandably shocked and flabbergasted victim, who was then further victimised by Hale’s disturbingly vivid account of her obsessive and criminal actions in the Guardian which failed to remove identifying information.

Richard Brittain took this one giant leap further.

Continue reading Authors Stalking Reviewers: From intimidatory Kathleen Hale to violent Richard Brittain #HaleNo

It’s World Mental Health Day! #WMHD

world mental health day

This year’s theme is ‘Living with Schizophrenia’.

In a taxi the other day, I heard on the radio a DJ suggesting that cancer treatment be prioritized over mental health services. That was a jaw-dropper. Mental illness can be just as deadly as cancer. ‘People with severe mental illness die 10-25 years earlier than the general population.’

Continue reading It’s World Mental Health Day! #WMHD

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Rating:

My read for Banned Books Week was certainly apropos. Fahrenheit 451 shows you the results of a book banning society. A scary, ignorant and shallow world where brutality and casual violence are everyday events done in the name of entertainment; a regressive and disabling move in social evolution, handicapping progression by limiting knowledge and encouraging selfishness.

Continue reading Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

The Uniformed Media Obsession with the Increased Use of Anti-depressants | 5 Mythbusting Facts

Daily Mail: As happy pill prescriptions top 50million, even GP admits: We hand out too many antidepressants
In the past few weeks I’ve seen article after article printed in newspapers shouting loud on the subject of anti-depressants. Doctors are over-prescribing them, they say. Doling them out like sweets to those that don’t need them, they claim.

Misleading statistics strike again.

Mythbuster #1: You don’t have to be depressed to take an anti-depressant. One drug can be used to treat more than one type of ailment. However, whatever it’s commonly used to treat, is what it becomes associated with. You say Prozac (Fluoxetine), we think anti-depressant. Did you know it’s also a treatment for bulimia and obsessive compulsive disorder?

Continue reading The Uniformed Media Obsession with the Increased Use of Anti-depressants | 5 Mythbusting Facts

When and how would you choose to (live and) die? Aged 60 or 100?

elderly crossingThis issue has been on my mind since my 54-year-old mother spent a couple of weeks in hospital in January. 99% of the patients on the emergency care ward and later the all-female general medicine ward, were over 80 and had mobility issues. And of those, about 90% suffered from dementia.

After witnessing this, I’ve been re-evaluating my retirement years; how I want to live, and when I want to die.

Continue reading When and how would you choose to (live and) die? Aged 60 or 100?

Review: Ligeia by Edgar Allan Poe

Ligeia
Rating:

The madness of grief personified.

Passionately in love with Ligeia, his wife, until she dies and he becomes obsessed with every detail of her memory. Later marrying Lady Rowena because he secretly likes that she ‘shunned’ him at every turn and that she’s Ligeia’s opposite in every way, but despite this he hates her because she’s not the one he loved most.

Continue reading Review: Ligeia by Edgar Allan Poe

Are Introverts Wrongly Labelled with Asperger’s?

While reading the “Daily Fail” to my ill mother, I came across this slightly disturbing article.

Darryl Hannah, actress with Asperger'sAs an introvert I intensely despise small talk, but I’m not autistic and I do not have Asperger syndrome, unlike actress Darryl Hannah (right). The “Daily Fail” has a rep for misrepresenting facts and blowing situations out of proportion, but I couldn’t help but question if introverts and those that can’t handle small talk are really being labelled with disorders, either officially or by self-diagnosis.

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What Reading Means to Me, Part II: The Teenage Years

Continuing on from What Reading Means to Me, Part I: The Early Years.

Secondary school (age 11-16) introduced me to the classics. Well, tragic classics:

The last was a stark lesson in the importance of treating people well, how you’d want to be treated, to avoid being responsible for harmful repercussions of my actions experienced by others.

But it wasn’t until I studied for my A-levels (age 16-18), after choosing English Literature and Psychology, that reading really changed me.

Continue reading What Reading Means to Me, Part II: The Teenage Years