Tag Archives: mystery

The Fade Out, Vol. 1 by Ed Brubaker & Sean Phillips

The Fade Out, vol. 1 by Ed BrubakerRating: 1 star

Offensive racist stereotyping, rampant sexism, an abundance of rape, clichéd and disjointed storytelling and an unwieldy cast of homogenous characters of which to keep track – what’s not to love about this 1940s noir in graphic novel form?

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The Great Paper Caper by Oliver Jeffers

The Great Paper Caper Oliver Jeffers
Rating:  

Oliver’s illustrations are lovely, except for the ginger-haired child with what I can only describe as a pink phallic object on his forehead which appears in every depiction of him. What the hell is it? Perhaps I should just say what we’re all thinking – dickhead. It’s a perfect representation, no? Did the editor not notice this . . . appendage before printing? I mean, it’s kind of obvious. Is it some sort of unique Australian thing of which I’m unaware?

The Great Paper Caper Oliver Jeffers

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The Murder at the Vicarage (Miss Marple #1) by Agatha Christie

The Murder at the Vicarage
Rating:

Surprisingly Miss Marple isn’t the protagonist, instead it’s a self-deprecating vicar with a dry sense of humour in his middle years who married in haste to his young wife and is repenting at leisure. He proposed to her after knowing her a day. A day! He’s so humble he claims his own sermons are dull.

‘The sneeze was not a usual kind of sneeze. It was, I presume, a special murderer’s sneeze.’

Haha!

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Review: Omens (Cainsville, #1) by Kelley Armstrong

Omens (Cainsville, #1)Rating: 1 star

After reading 11 chapters I decided to put this down and return it to the library. Not because it was terrible – the writing hooked me from the start, and the characterization was detailed, delivered via “show” rather than “tell”, but it was obvious to me that I was going to be strung along.

Clearly this is a mystery and not paranormal, as advertised. From Armstrong’s last few novels, I knew reading the whole would provide few answers to the questions and mysteries posed in the opening chapters. Frustration would only sour my view, so I chose not to continue.

Continue reading Review: Omens (Cainsville, #1) by Kelley Armstrong