Tag Archives: read in 2014

The Girl Who Loved Doctor Who by Paul Cornell

The Girl Who Loved Doctor WhoRating:

Unless you’re a huge fan of Matt Smith as Doctor Who you won’t enjoy The Girl Who Loved Doctor Who, but then even if you are a fan I doubt this would be a guaranteed 5-star wonder. And although Matt Smith looks like Matt Smith I didn’t particularly like the illustrations.

Continue reading The Girl Who Loved Doctor Who by Paul Cornell

The Murder at the Vicarage (Miss Marple #1) by Agatha Christie

The Murder at the Vicarage
Rating:

Surprisingly Miss Marple isn’t the protagonist, instead it’s a self-deprecating vicar with a dry sense of humour in his middle years who married in haste to his young wife and is repenting at leisure. He proposed to her after knowing her a day. A day! He’s so humble he claims his own sermons are dull.

‘The sneeze was not a usual kind of sneeze. It was, I presume, a special murderer’s sneeze.’

Haha!

Continue reading The Murder at the Vicarage (Miss Marple #1) by Agatha Christie

Meathouse Man by George R.R. Martin

Meathouse Man

Rating:

This is some fucked up shit. Misogynistic and necrophilic fucked up shit. With illustrations. My inner feminist is vibrating with rage and is drawing disturbing comparisons with serial killer Elliot Rodger.

The meathouse is a whorehouse whose ‘whores’ are dead women, most of whom are former criminals and debtors although some have been kidnapped and killed precisely to be commodified by transforming them into brainless undead prostitutes. Outside of the meathouses, corpses are used as workers directed by handlers (read: puppeteers), similar to what The People do with vampires in Ilona Andrews’s Kate Daniels series. The entertainment industry is dominated by corpse fights like the gladiators of old, their handlers manipulating them like 3-D real world video game characters.

Continue reading Meathouse Man by George R.R. Martin

If you were a dinosaur, my love by Rachel Swirsky

If you were a dinosaur, my loveRating:

So you’re sitting at home watching Jurassic Park with your boyfriend for the millionth time and you turn to look at him and wonder . . . If you were a dinosaur, my love . . .

An ode to a surreal, lyrical fantasy that’s moments away from turning into monster porn. Until the end when the fantasy cracks to reveal a violent reality, and the inspiration for the daydream.

Continue reading If you were a dinosaur, my love by Rachel Swirsky

The Golden Ass: Or Metamorphoses by Lucius Apuleius

The Golden Ass: Or Metamorphoses (Penguin Classics)Rating:

Bestiality. Kidnapping. Mugging. Ye olde carjacking. Burglary. Assault. Murder. Female paedophiles. Incest. Male rape. Adultery. Animal cruelty. Serial killers in the making. Poisonings. Homosexual priest gangbangs. Shapeshifting. Gods and goddesses. The Seven Deadly Sins. Evil mother-in-laws. Drama. Comedy. Tragedy. Adventure. Romance. Horror. Urban legends. Stories within stories. Inspiration for that Hannibal episode where a person was sewn into a dead horse’s belly.

What doesn’t The Golden Ass have?

Continue reading The Golden Ass: Or Metamorphoses by Lucius Apuleius

Through the Looking Glass (Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland #2) by Lewis Carroll

Through the Looking GlassRating:

Okay, so I didn’t enjoy Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland but I had a free audio of Through the Looking Glass voiced by Miriam Margolyes, and I thought, why not?

Continue reading Through the Looking Glass (Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland #2) by Lewis Carroll

Love Story by Jeanne C. Stein

Love Story (from Dead but Not Forgotten)
Rating:

Fans of Charlaine Harris’s Sookie Stackhouse series may be interested in this one as Stein imagines Adele Stackhouse’s (Sookie’s grandmother) affair with Fintan, a fairy, written as extracts of Adele’s long-lost diary from that time period.

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The Annotated Pride and Prejudice: A Revised and Expanded Edition by Jane Austen

The Annotated Pride and Prejudice: A Revised and Expanded EditionRating:

“Pride is a very common failing I believe… human nature is particularly prone to it, and there are very few of us who do not cherish a feeling of self-complacency on the score of some quality or other, real or imaginary. Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.” [p36]

Ah, one of the most widely read books in history – the pressure! But since Ms. Austen’s Emma is the reason I received a D in one of my English Lit exams, I’ve held a bit of a grudge.

Continue reading The Annotated Pride and Prejudice: A Revised and Expanded Edition by Jane Austen